Our Audiobook Titles


Pro Cycling on $10 a Day: From Fat Kid to Euro Pro

By Phil Gaimon
Read by Sean Runnette

Available on
Audible & iTunes

Plump, grumpy, slumped on the couch, and going nowhere fast at age 16, Phil Gaimon began riding a bicycle with the grand ambition of shedding a few pounds before going off to college. He soon fell into racing and discovered he was a natural, riding his way into a pro contract after just one season despite utter ignorance of a century of cycling etiquette. Now, in his book Pro Cycling on $10 a Day, Phil brings the full powers of his wit to tell his story.

Presented here as a guide – and a warning – to aspiring racers who dream of joining the professional racing circus, Phil’s adventures in road rash serve as a hilarious and cautionary tale of frustrating team directors and broken promises. Phil’s education in the ways of the peloton, his discouraging negotiations for a better contract, his endless miles crisscrossing America in pursuit of race wins, and his conviction that somewhere just around the corner lies the ticket to the big time fuel this tale of hope and ambition from one of cycling’s best story-tellers.

Pro Cycling on $10 a Day chronicles the racer’s daily lot of blood-soaked bandages, sleazy motels, cheap food, and overflowing toilets. But it also celebrates the true beauty of the sport and the worth of the journey, proving in the end that even among the narrow ranks of world-class professional cycling, there will always be room for a hard-working outsider.


The End of the Road: The Festina Affair and the Tour that Almost Wrecked Cycling

By Alasdair Fotheringham
Read by Tim Gerard Reynolds

Available on
Audible & iTunes

The Tour de France is always one of the most spectacular and dramatic events in sports. But the 1998 Tour provided drama like no other. As the opening stages in Ireland unfolded, the Festina team’s soigneur, Willy Voet, was arrested at the French-Belgian border with a carload of drugs. Raid upon police raid followed, with arrest after arrest hammering the Tour. In protest, there were riders’ strikes and go-slows, with several squads withdrawing en masse and one expelled. By the time the Tour reached Paris, just 96 of the 189 starters remained, and of those 189 starters, more than a quarter were later reported to have doped. The 1998 “Tour de Farce’s” status as one of the most scandal-struck sporting events in history was confirmed.

Voet’s arrest was just the beginning of cycling’s biggest mass doping controversy – what became known as the Festina affair. It all but destroyed professional cycling as the credibility of the entire sport was called into question, and the cycling family began to split apart even as, ironically, the 1998 Tour was also one of the best races in years.

The End of the Road is the first book in English to provide in-depth analysis and a colorful evocation of the tumultuous events of the 1998 Tour. Alasdair Fotheringham uncovers how the world’s biggest bike race sank into such scandal. He explores its long-term consequences and what, if any, lessons were learned.

Ride The Revolution: Inside Stories from Women in Cycling
Edited by Suze Clemitson
Read by X E Sands

Available on
Audible & iTunes

Featuring contributions from: Emma O’Reilly, the soigneur for the US Postal Service Team and one of the people responsible for bringing Lance Armstrong down as part of David Walsh’s investigation; Betsy Andreu, wife of ex-professional cyclist Frankie Andreu and another Lance Armstrong nemesis; and Jen See, who interviews Marianne Vos, arguably the greatest cyclist in the world right now.

When Marie Marvingt decided to ride the 1908 Tour de France she was told “absolument, non!” Instead, she rode each stage 15 minutes after the official racers had departed and finished all 4,488 kms of the parcours – a feat that only 36 of the 110 men who entered the race could equal. Her motto? “I decided to do everything better, always and forever.” It’s in the spirit of Breakneck Marie that this book has been written.

These fresh and vibrant voices examine the sport from a new perspective to provide insights that rarely make it into the mainstream: what is it like to be a top women rider or to work in their support team? Where is the women’s sport heading and when will more women be represented at the highest level of sport’s governance?


Faster: The Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists
By Michael Hutchinson
Read by Simon Vance

Available on
Audible & iTunes

For professional cyclists, going faster and winning are, of course, closely related. Yet surprisingly, for many, a desire to go faster is much more important than a desire to win. Someone who wants to go faster will work at the details and take small steps rather than focusing on winning. Winning just happens when you do everything right – it’s the doing everything right that’s hard. And that’s what fascinates and obsesses Michael Hutchinson.

With his usual deadpan delivery and an awareness that it’s all mildly preposterous, Hutchinson looks at the things that make you faster – training, nutrition, the right psychology – and explains how they work and how what we know about them changes all the time. He looks at the things that make you slower and why they do so and how attempts to avoid them can result in serious athletes gradually painting themselves into the most peculiar lifestyle corners.

Faster is a book about why cyclists do what they do; about what the riders, their coaches, and the boffins get up to behind the scenes; and about why the whole idea of going faster is such an appealing, universal instinct for all of us.