Late to the party

      18 Comments on Late to the party

The season has begun.  My head is a boiling cauldron, overflowing with sacrificed goats, scabs and equipment failures.  And yet, standing atop Mt. Fuck You’s 80 inches of atmosphere challenging majesty, all is quiet.  Why?

I am easily overwhelmed.  To it!

Tires.  Yup, still gluing them.  And doing a really, really poor job of it.  Them shit’s is ugly.

I left last year’s glue on two sets of Major Toms, and some tape that survived on another set I liberated from teammate Bryan Carbone.

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Bryan Carbone, separated at birth from Jeremiah Johnson? (BC photo stolen from Dominique Verlaan)

I gather there are two schools of thought on extant glue.  And one building of thought that may have been a school once.  Or a shed.  Lets call it Old School.

First school: clean the rim after the old tire has been removed.  Acetone, grinders, sharp things, sweat.
Second school: leave most of it.  It doesn’t WANT to come off.  That’s a good thing, right? Trim down the bumpy, suspect looking bits, get it mostly even, and glue away.
Old school: take old, used tires, with lumpy bits of glue on them, and then glue ’em up to old, lumpy, uncleaned rims.

IMG_1696 IMG_1699 IMG_1698
Each of ’em got 2 layers of glue

I went Old School.  The PDXs forgave everything.  The new Challenges look a bit like a sea serpent coursing through the swells, back rising and falling as it pursues an afrighted crew into the dread Horse Latitudes…  I digress.

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2 layers for the old tires, 3 for the new one

A point in favor of the Clement line up?  They line up.  Beautifully.  They seem to want to center themselves on the rim.  Aligning a PDX while the glue is still wet is easy-peasy.  It makes you feel like you know what you’re doing.  Which is why FOLLOWING that with a Challenge is, um, a challenge.  Reluctant to ASK someone what I’m doing wrong, I have interwebularly found that there is a better way to line ’em up.  What I’ve been doing-making sure the tire is lit from both sides to better see where the tread is (tougher than you might think in a basement), slapping them on the rim and trying to tame the wandering snake that’s where my tire should be-is the bare minimum.  For the last set of hoops, finding the right “track” for the tire BEFORE the glue goes on may help.  (Thinking about markering it in red, with a water based pen…) Using the base tape where it comes over the rim as a guide may also aid in de-fuglifying the process.  We’ll see.

I’m using too much glue, methinks, on the final pass. Great sweaty gobs of glue come bubbling out  from beneath the tire when I inflate it to 50psi for the day of rest.

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Very Pro

These pustules chew brake pads like parmesan getting murdered at an Olive Garden and sound like cards in the spokes. #notpro

The End Result:


Challenge Chicane, as interpreted by a hack


Clement PDX, hack-proof

The Chicane rear Grifo front combo has held through more’n a few Wednesday Worlds, Nittany 1 & 2, and Independence (he says, knowing he’s just doomed himself.)  The PDXs haven’t been ridden more’n a coupla times at WW’s and the high school field next to our place.  My glue technique, like my dismounts, is ungainly and tough to look at, but it’s getting the job done.  I brought this same lack-of-skillset to the wheels last year and 19 races later had to pull the tires off with a pair of pliers.  So lots of glue is kinda good, right?

In other wheel-related news, I found a Park TS2, which has made truing and gluing a lot more fun. Not flipping the wheel every time I want to check the dish is a HUGE improvement.

Next up?

IMG_1711
My new travel bag, starts are hard, and why does my hip hurt?

18 thoughts on “Late to the party

  1. Norm McCheese

    I found Racing Ralps to be easy, the PDXs to be insanely hard to the point I got shit everywhere trying to put them on. By “everywhere” I mean the neighbor’s pet fish. I think the rims were the difference.

    Reply
      1. Norm McCheese

        The PDXs went on some wide China carbon rims that EO built me. The RRs went on a set of JimTech wheels that JV built and I bought from him later.

        Reply
      2. Norm McCheese

        I think that’s right, they are MTs. I did not stretch them, and had no issues with them. Well the RRs and MT combo. The other ones, well looks like Gallgher had his was with a jar of Fluff.

        Reply
  2. Norm McCheese

    I found Racing Ralps to be easy, the PDXs to be insanely hard to the point I got shit everywhere trying to put them on. By “everywhere” I mean the neighbor’s pet fish. I think the rims were the difference.

    Reply
      1. Norm McCheese

        The PDXs went on some wide China carbon rims that EO built me. The RRs went on a set of JimTech wheels that JV built and I bought from him later.

        Reply
      2. Norm McCheese

        I think that’s right, they are MTs. I did not stretch them, and had no issues with them. Well the RRs and MT combo. The other ones, well looks like Gallgher had his was with a jar of Fluff.

        Reply
  3. Lou B

    Interestingly enough, I just went through gluing up my first few tubs since I had to true up my RevWW rear wheel (which has internal nipples). Since I had to remove the tire to true it, I figured I’d practice on my backup Williams alloy tubs so I ripped those tires off too 🙂 Turns out to have been a wise choice as I glued up some used Grifo’s to the Williams and I managed to get glue all up the sidewall and down the entire side of the rim while trying to seat it – DOH! I did the electrical tape masking job on the carbon wheel and the PDX practically went on straight the first time. I heart Clements.

    Good read sir.

    Reply
    1. seanrunnette

      And that right there is why I’ll NEVER buy a wheel with recessed or hidden nipples. Makes it too difficult to give ’em the mid season purple nurple. And when you’re as shit as I am at avoiding things on the ground, you NEED that access. Good job with the masking. I was too lazy this year, and mostly got away with it.

      Reply
  4. Lou B

    Interestingly enough, I just went through gluing up my first few tubs since I had to true up my RevWW rear wheel (which has internal nipples). Since I had to remove the tire to true it, I figured I’d practice on my backup Williams alloy tubs so I ripped those tires off too 🙂 Turns out to have been a wise choice as I glued up some used Grifo’s to the Williams and I managed to get glue all up the sidewall and down the entire side of the rim while trying to seat it – DOH! I did the electrical tape masking job on the carbon wheel and the PDX practically went on straight the first time. I heart Clements.

    Good read sir.

    Reply
    1. seanrunnette

      And that right there is why I’ll NEVER buy a wheel with recessed or hidden nipples. Makes it too difficult to give ’em the mid season purple nurple. And when you’re as shit as I am at avoiding things on the ground, you NEED that access. Good job with the masking. I was too lazy this year, and mostly got away with it.

      Reply
  5. shawn Erickson

    I had the exact same experience with Clement PDX tires. Maybe a ‘halo effect’ from all the PROs who use them.

    The Belgies like it straight and hard. Clement breeds out any tires with Peyronie’s Syndrome (search ‘Bill Clinton’s little Elvis’, search ‘Bill Clinton roll of quarters’)

    Reply
  6. shawn Erickson

    I had the exact same experience with Clement PDX tires. Maybe a ‘halo effect’ from all the PROs who use them.

    The Belgies like it straight and hard. Clement breeds out any tires with Peyronie’s Syndrome (search ‘Bill Clinton’s little Elvis’, search ‘Bill Clinton roll of quarters’)

    Reply
  7. Pingback: All Tires Must Die. Apparently. | Fuck You Cyclocross

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